Overmountain Institute to hold first annual session next weekend

The Overmountain Institute will soon be in session, with the first semester underway in just over a week, taking place from March 8 to March 10.

Museum Curatorial Assistant Chad Bogart said the event came about after a group of volunteers attended an event in West Virginia.

“We want to focus on our local stories,” Bogart said. “We want to take an in-depth look at colonial life on the frontier.”

The institute is going to be a weekend-long series of activities and speakers dedicated to showcasing colonial life in a different manner than previous events the state park hosts.

“Normally we do static displays or something of that nature,” he said. “This is a classroom setting, where people will come away with a better understanding.”

This will be a three-day curriculum. Friday evening will feature a presentation called the “Campaign to King’s Mountain.” On Saturday, six different presenters will showcase various aspects of pioneer life, including religious and medicinal practices and even blacksmithing.

“We had a huge response to our Evening with Andrew Jackson,” Bogart said. “People enjoy evening programs like that.”

The program, though still in its infancy, has attracted people from across the state of Tennessee to both attend and volunteer.

“These people are the cream of the crop when it comes to story-telling,” Bogart said. “We are getting folks from Kentucky and North Carolina.”

He said the event is for everyone, but especially those who wanted to go beyond the surface level of history.

The event has been in development for over a year.

“We have always wanted to do something like this,” he said. “This just became the best possible time.”

The timing gave the park some trouble, as Bogart said it was difficult to find a weekend during which both staff members and the presenters would be available.

Despite the challenges, people from every corner of the state are already expressing interest.

“We are getting responses west of Nashville,” Bogart said. “This is a far-reaching event.”

Those interested in attending can register either online or in person. Registration is $50 and the event has a ceiling of 100 participants, but Bogart said the fee covers everything during Friday and Saturday, while Sunday’s events are open to the public as a whole.

A full schedule of presentations and activities are on the Sycamore Shoals State Park website.

Local news

Craft & Vendor Sale planned for Saturday

Local news

Frye-Clark, Smith honored for impact on community

Local news

Elizabethton teen’s journey to success in SkillsUSA

Local news

Mom’s journey and her newspaper delivery

Local news

State of Franklin Healthcare Associates agree to resolve potential controlled substances act claims

Community

Senior Center Schedule

Local news

Northeast Tennessee music census launching May 8

Community

E-T Ballet Academy will perform ‘Cinderella’

Arrests

Elizabethton Police report multiple arrests FROM STAFF REPORTS

Church News

Church Briefs

Local news

Greers receive Milligan’s Fide et Amore Award

Local news

TVA awards over $3 million to help make schools safer, more energy efficient

Church News

Harvest Baptist Missions Team

Local news

Kentucky man sentenced to eight years after child’s death on Norris Lake

Local news

ACP, Food City collaborate to offer new pharmacy technician program

Local news

Cherokee National Forest contractors begin work at Horse Creek Campground

Church News

Why should we forgive one another?

Church News

A million years from now

Local news

ETSU ROTC cadets to get commissions in special ceremony 

Local news

Camera technology protecting community, officers

Local news

Country music icon John Anderson to perform ‘An Acoustic Evening’ at NPAC 

Local news

Jaycie Jenkins named Milligan 2024 Outstanding Student Teacher

Local news

Gatton College of Pharmacy will host summer camp

Local news

Group voices concerns about new law arming teachers, staff