Chancellor orders resident to work on furlough in order to address litter code

Billy Joe Miller returned to stand in front of Chancellor John Rambo Wednesday morning in a follow-up to being found in civil contempt last week. Now Miller has been sentenced to jail to work until he has successfully cleaned his property.

Code Enforcement Officer Jay Cook said Miller received specific measures in order to alleviate the violation during his court appearance on Tuesday, May 28.

“Rambo informed Miller that he did not make the clean up a top priority as he had ordered, and because of that he was sentenced to jail to work on furlough until the property becomes compliant,” Cook said. “Miller was ordered to clean the property and upon completion would purge himself of contempt.”

Wednesday’s decision comes on the heels of other court decisions over the past few weeks, as city and county governments are trying to find ways to alleviate unsightly litter and other trash in communities.

“Most of the properties that are brought to my attention are in violation of the county’s Litter Resolution,” he said. “They are reported by neighbors and other citizens that find the property to be a nuisance.”

The resolution went into effect in 2017, allowing citizens to receive 30-day warnings about litter on their property. Those found to be in violation can even contact Cook in order to figure out a remedial plan in order to more easily become compliant.

“We in the planning office, myself in particular, do not want to force court on anyone,” Cook said. “I do not want people to have to pay court fees and appear before the chancellor over a property nuisance that can be easily remedied by cleaning the property.”

Despite this, however, Cook said the ultimate responsibility for cleaning up the property rests with the property owner, and if the commission receives enough complaints, they need to act.

“This matter is taken very seriously in our office and by county officials,” he said. “I do my best to take complaints and do everything I can to get properties in compliance, but the ultimate responsibility lies with the property owner, and unfortunately, today’s events can be the outcome.”

Local news

Annual Elizabethton Memorial Day Ceremony scheduled for Monday, May 27

Local news

Gov. Lee makes pitch to bring Super Bowl to new Titans stadium, NFL commissioner plays coy

Local news

National Trails Day celebrated June 1 in area state parks

Local news

Two former HVHS graduates complete prestigious state-wide leadership program

Arrests

Johnson City Police arrest Blountville man on aggravated assault, vandalism charges

Local news

Lawsuit: Business partner of alleged serial rapist made extortion payments to Johnson City police

Local news

Memorial Day concert Monday at Sycamore Shoals State Park

Local news

Democrat Women’s Club will meet Tuesday at Mayflower

Local news

Dormant to dynamics; ETSU’s spring planting tips

Local news

MEPS students get first-hand look behind Electric System

News

Two Elizabethton residents receive degrees at Carson-Newman U.

Local news

City of Elizabethton announces Memorial Day trash schedule

Local news

BBQ Fundraiser to support veteran set for Saturday

Local news

Introducing the ETSU Alumni Summer Series

Local news

Caroline Price awarded Maggie Crosby Tetrick Diversity in Leadership Scholarship

Local news

Summer means road trips and increased bear activity

Local news

From the coaching box to the AD’s office…Ryan Presnell ready to tackle new role

Local news

A Life Lived: Judy Bailey spent her life doing for others

Local news

Getting his priorities in order…Holt stepping down to spend more time with family

Local news

Tennessee set to begin summer EBT distribution

Local news

Roan Mountain student makes Dean’s List at C-N College

Local news

Memorial Day weekend TWRA registration, safety checkpoints

Local news

Tennessee 2023-24 business tax revenues continue to fall short of predictions

Local news

‘Pipes to People’: City water resource project safeguards key pipeline